Tag Archives: Pokémon

Pokémon Snap

Pokémon Snap

Game: Pokémon Snap
Start Date: July 3rd, 2016
Videos: 6

Back in the late 90s, the Pokemon craze was going wild, and while the video games were doing excellently, it’s no surprise that a bunch of spin-offs were made for the series as well. One of these spin-offs was not about capturing or battling with Pokemon, but taking pictures of Pokemon.

At the end of my Generation 2 playthrough, I mentioned wanting to do some of the spin-off games before I started Generation 3 and I knew Pokemon Snap was one I could get done very quickly in between projects. Although I wasn’t sure when I wanted to start the NES Marathon yet, I knew that if I put the playthrough in July, I could get it done quickly and casually finish up Super Mario Galaxy by itself for the rest of the month if I wanted to do the marathon in August. That’s pretty much what I decided to do.

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Super Smash Bros. Brawl

Super Smash Bros. Brawl

Game: Super Smash Bros. Brawl
Start Date: January 16th, 2016
Videos: 44

After the huge success of Super Smash Bros. Melee on the Gamecube, gamers during the Wii generation wondered when Smash was going to get its eventual upgrade. After a glorified E3 trailer, where Metal Gear’s own Solid Snake made his first appearance in the world of Smash, gamers were hyped for Super Smash Bros. Brawl. From the daily Smash Dojo updates, to the first reveal from Japanese content, to the newly established online mode, this game was looking to be a Smash hit!

After kind of stepping away from doing Melee 100%, I knew that there was no way a 100% playthrough of Brawl would be done. However, I did want to make sure that Brawl was still on the agenda at least, because this was definitely a big game for me during the years of 2008-2009. This playthrough will feature a full session of the Subspace Emissary, and I’ll also show off some content from the game itself as well. It’s time to BRAWL!

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Pokémon Gold

Pokémon Gold

Game: Pokémon Gold
Start Date: May 18th, 2015
Videos: 61

A few years have passed since the initial Pokémon adventure story, where a young kid from Pallet Town became the Pokémon League champion, stopped Team Rocket and captured all 151 Pokémon. All of this happened in the land of Kanto, but to the west of this land lies the land of Johto, where a new adventure is unfolding with new experiences, new challenges and 100 new Pokémon.

Pokémon Trainer Rob is BACK! But now in the land of Johto. After my Pokémon Blue LP back in 2012, I knew it was only a matter of time before I made my way back to the world of Pokémon for Generation II. Not only will this adventure be longer, but with the added challenge of trying to complete the Pokédex..AGAIN? Guess I’m in for the long haul…

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Super Smash Bros. Melee

Super Smash Bros. Melee

Game: Super Smash Bros. Melee
Start Date: September 13th, 2014
Videos: 30

After the release of Super Smash Bros. on the Nintendo 64, HAL had no plans for a follow-up to the multiplayer slam-fest. However, after the game had received such popularity, the company returned once again to make an even bigger game on the Nintendo Gamecube. And thus, one of the most popular competitive fighting games was born, with more characters, more stages, more modes of play, and more multiplayer mayhem.

Smash Hype was still going strong in the summer after my N64 LP had already ended. Because of this, I made an executive decision to start the sequel a bit earlier than I had already planned. It also worked out quite well because this project released during the first week of Smash Bros. 3DS being out in Japan. I guess the only thing that really needs to be said now…”Bring on the Melee!”

Although this project is complete, there is a possibility for me returning to this game in the future to collect the rest of the trophies and completing some of the hardest challenges this game has to offer. For now though….not exactly in the mood! XD

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Super Smash Bros.

Super Smash Bros.

Game: Super Smash Bros.
Start Date: May 24th, 2014
Runtime: 4 hours
Videos: 13

Back in the old days, one of gamers’ greatest fantasies was the thought of combining all of Nintendo’s mascot characters and putting them into a game where they could just go wild and fight each other. It was Super Smash Bros., a game developed by Masahiro Sakurai, the developer of Kirby, that finally accomplished this feat and had a tremendous legacy that developed alongside it.

I still had not figured out how to tackle Mario Party DS yet and I was definitely not ready for Mario Kart: Super Circuit either, so I decided to focus on another spin-off game instead. With all the hype surrounding the upcoming Super Smash Bros. 4, it seemed like the best time to go back to the Smash Bros. roots and start celebrating the hype in a proper way! I also decided to incorporate “#SmashHype” as a way for my viewers to contribute to the hype of the new games and promote even more discussion.

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Twitch Plays A Meme-a-thon!

Twitch Plays A Meme-a-thon!

The Internet has exploded with lots and lots of new gaming trends, most of which consist of the newest hit games. However, there are some trends that are very unique and focus on older classics games. Today I am going to be talking about one of the newest trends, and unless you are a gamer who has been living under a rock, the chances are that you have probably heard something in regards to the streaming channel known as “Twitch Plays Pokémon.”

Here is a little bit of background for those who do not know a whole lot about this phenomenon. Twitch Plays Pokémon was started about a month ago when the channel was first created for the purpose of a social experiment. The idea was to create program a bot that would play through the game Pokémon Red, taking in movement directions and button presses from the stream users who were chatting while the stream is live. The idea was to see how well the stream users would work together and how long it would take them to get to the very end of the game. At first, the results were very successful considering the small amount of traffic and popularity the stream would have at that point, but over time it would get to the point where there would be almost 100 button inputs per second. Safe to say, this led to a lot of situations where the main character would either go way further than intended, or spend up to 10 minutes looking through the item menu. This also led to numerous controversies and hardships; like buying the wrong evolution stone when having very limited funds, or perhaps the most damaging, releasing a decently leveled-up starter Pokémon into the wild, amongst several others.

A lot of these hardships and decisions were warmly welcomed by the viewing public though, looking at the events as less of a crutch but more of a meme or trend of some kind. One of the most prominent jokes is the “Praise Helix” meme, where the main character, while battling or getting through a particular area, would just randomly go into the item menu and try to use the “Helix Fossil” item, an item which cannot be used directly in that fashion, nor can it be thrown away. In fact, another meme would be the evolutionary stone incident I spoke of a little bit earlier. The original plan was to obtain a Vaporeon by evolving an Eevee with a Water Stone. However, because the audience had a hard time actually purchasing the Water Stone, they ended up with a Fire Stone instead, prompting Eevee’s evolution into Flareon instead. As a result, when the group tried to release or deposit Flareon into the PC storage system, they ended up releasing several Pokémon, including their starter and another Pokémon that had been with them for a very long time. Because of this, Flareon was given the nickname “The False Prophet.” This has also prompted a variety of other nicknames, like Pidgeot who is more commonly known as “Bird Jesus” during the playthrough; given the name due to its extremely high level (from being around since the beginning of the game) and being one of the biggest factors in many of the game’s big battles.

Despite all the difficulty, after about 2 weeks of live streaming, Twitch Plays Pokémon Red was completed, a feat that was actually quite impressive considering the circumstances. Now, don’t get me wrong, I am aware that the game can be completed in speed run fashion (without glitches) in about a few hours, however, you have to realize that with the way this was set-up and organized, an extremely long playtime was unavoidable. For one, Twitch already has a very noticeable and recognizable delay in streamer-chat interaction. So as a result, the audience who is watching and participating is at least 15 seconds behind what is actually going on. Second, we can’t be ignorant of the existence of trolls, or people who exist for the sole purpose of throwing a wrench into the works. I think one of the clearest examples of this mindset is when the main character is in a very unfortunate position where there is only a one-square line in between a wall and a ledge that the hero can fall off of. If they fall off the ledge, they have to restart the entire walk and do it over again. And let’s be real here; there will always be that one guy who wants to postpone progress for his own hilarity. Twitch Plays did actually interfere a few times and implemented a few different features to help the game move along, but the features are still pretty damn exploitable and easy to manipulate and mess up. So when it’s all said and done, I’m impressed that that it actually took them half the amount of time I expected them to finish with.

Now, before I get into how I feel about all of this, I will say that I did not watch very much of the stream, nor did I actually get into it. I was introduced to the stream by one of my closest friends who had wondered if I heard anything about it yet. This was at the very start of the second week and they were at the Safari Zone, trying to obtain the necessary items to progress the plot. I wondered if this feat was even possible, considering you have a very limited amount of spaces you can move before you are thrown out of the place completely. After watching about ten minutes of the affair, I clicked away and went back to whatever I was doing before that. It turns out that they did beat the Safari Zone, not long after I clicked away, but I still never had the desire to watch. I guess you could compare it to the “Observant Gamer Complex,” a condition where you are watching one of your favorite games being played, but feel almost irritated that it’s not being done in the way you are used to, or just in a very inefficient manner. You rememember whenever your best friend would come over to play Mario games with you, but you sometimes wish you could just take the controller out of his hand and do it your way? That’s what this stream kind of felt like for me and just didn’t seem like a very good use for my time. Every morning after I woke up and every night before I would go to sleep, I did check in to see how the game was progressing, and most of the time, I was actually really surprised at the results. Most of the time, I did walk in to a major trouble spot, usually the character trying to battle the evil “ledge” or even trying to get out of a Pokémon Center, but whenever I left and came back, usually that part was accomplished or finished in some way, so progress was definitely being made. I was just never around for it, nor did I really have an interest to be around for it.

When it’s all said and done though, I have to give Twitch Plays Pokémon credit where the credit is due. For a social experiment, it has definitely done an amazing job. I wouldn’t say it brought this world together, nor did it achieve anything worth a Nobel prize, but it accomplished what it set out to do, probably in ways that nobody expected. There were definitely a lot of changes and implementations that strayed away from what the original design of the project was, but I don’t feel like it affected the teamwork atmosphere. Various sites and Google documents were created just for the sole purpose of this streaming channel in coordinating with other players, gamers, and participants to nail down a concrete plan of attack for every single situation. When the “False Prophet” controversy happened, everybody was already working on the next plan of attack. When an HM move Pokémon was released, like clockwork, people came up with a Plan B and were ready to aim for a different Pokémon to incorporate into the team. Not only in long-term planning, but strategies were also created in order to control the vast number of inputs being made all at once, making use of the 15-second delay and a nifty “Start” button trick that would allow the character not to move in the wrong direction if it seemed like there would be a case of that.

I also think that Twitch Plays Pokémon did a lot of good in the creativity department as well. Although many of the jokes and memes are silly and were created for the sole purpose of humor, I can appreciate the way that the community tried to embrace it. Pictures and art were created, stories and fanfics were made…it turned a two-week session (of what should be a 50-hour (very, very rough estimate) normal game playthrough) of running into walls and checking out helix fossils into a entity of its own, almost a movie or narrative of some kind, and that’s something I can really respect and appreciate, even if it’s not something I am terribly interested in.

One day after the completion of Pokémon Red, it was to no surprise that Twitch Plays Pokémon started working on another Pokémon game, this time Pokémon Crystal. As of the moment I am writing this post, they are currently in the Kanto portion of the game (the shorter “2nd half” of the game after the Elite Four), so they have made a pretty good amount of progress for being this far into the game after only eleven days, especially considering that the second generation Pokémon games are easily twice as long as the first generation. I’m not sure if this means that the viewers are becoming more in-tune with how the channel or trolls work, or if they have just gotten incredibly lucky with the entire journey so far, but you can’t argue with results and progress.

I should also mention that since the creation of Twitch Plays Pokémon, there have been a variety of other channels created for the sole purpose of trying this experiment with other games. I am not surprised by this development, but from the look of things, nothing is as popular as Twitch Plays Pokémon.

That’s all I want to say about the matter. If you guys are interested in the Twitch Plays Pokémon action, check out the live stream located here. If you are like me and not really interested in watching Red/Silver walk into a wall for several hours, consider checking out the Google Docs page which does a great job of covering all of the essential information, including what the current “goal” is, and a link to a page which keeps a very detailed and live status report on everything that happens throughout the day and is updated quite regularly (so that it never feels like more than 30, 20, or even 10 minutes to get an update).

Thanks for reading today folks and I will see you Star Warriors next time!

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Pokémon Stadium

Pokémon Stadium

Game: Pokémon Stadium
Start Date: August 26th, 2013
Runtime: 6 hours
Videos: 22

The Pokémon craze was going strong in the late 90s and because of it, Nintendo found it necessary to create as many Pokémon games as possible to capitalize on this phenomenon. One of the games was Pokémon Sadium, a 3D Battler where you can take all of the original 151 Pokemon and battle them against each other. This game also capitalized on the N64 Transfer pack, which allowed you to transfer your Pokémon from the Red, Blue, and Yellow versions of the game and wreck the competition with them on a whole new platform.

This playthrough, much like the game itself (which capitalized on the Pokémon craze of the late 90s), was capitalizing on the success of my Pokémon Blue Let’s Play, taking my main team and bringing them into the world of Pokémon Stadium to take on the toughest opponents of the N64 generation. Although I wouldn’t say this LP was as successful as the Blue LP, it was still a lot of fun to do. I also made a comeback to this game in 2017 when I played through the rest of Round 1 with Rental Pokemon and may come back even later with even more teams for Round 2 rounds!

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Pokémon Blue

Pokémon Blue

Game: Pokémon Blue
Start Date: April 3rd, 2012
Runtime: 19 hours
Videos: 47

Pokémon has come a long way since it’s initial creation back in the 90’s, and in the video game world, it all started with this game (along with the Red and Yellow versions of course). Allow me to walk you through the scenario; you are a young kid, you live next to the world’s most popular expert in Pokémon, who has a grandson who is the biggest jerk in the universe, and one fateful day, you are not only given a Pokémon of your own, but also the permission to travel on a grand adventure with you and your Pokémon friends. This notion made kids around the world go crazy for Pokémon, and this was the start of it all!

At this point in time, including games I would later replay, this was the 50th playthrough I did on my channel, and to celebrate this milestone, I wanted to do something big! I had wanted to do something with Pokémon for a very long time, but I didn’t want it to be anything small or “expected.” So for my 50th project, not only did I play my first Pokémon game, but I added the challenge of trying to catch all 150 Pokemon. This was an endeavor that I do not regret in any way, shape or form, as it led to one of my most enjoyable projects, for not just you guys, but also myself. I had started doubting that I would ever have a playthrough as good as The Simpsons: Hit and Run, until I played Pokémon.

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